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2017 Hallowe’en Supper in the Globe Inn

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Members and friends of the Burns Howff Club assembled in the Globe Inn for their traditional Hallowe’en Supper and were welcomed by President Colin Gibson whose first task was to firmly banish any ghosts or vampires thought to be abroad on that date.

After dinner, guest speaker Jim Brown from New Cumnock, regaled the company with a witty and informative talk on the origins and customs of All Hallow’s  Eve€¯, the ancient Celtic Festival of Samhuinnā€¯ which had Pagan roots and featured the worship of the dead until it was Christianised by the early church which introduced the practice of lighting candles on the graves of the dead. A custom now died out. Hallowe’en gave birth to the American custom of “Trick-or treat” by children on 31st October and the Scottish equivalent of ‘Guising’€¯ when youngsters would visit house in disguise and receive fruit or small gifts in return for a song or recitation, well described by Robert Burns in his epic poem, Hallowe’en€¯.
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Mr Brown, a former secretary of New Cumnock Burns Club and noted authority on the poet, was thanked by the President and accepted an inscribed tankard.

Contributing to a stellar entertainment programme was Leonard Brown on the accordion with an eclectic selection from ‘The Flying Scotsman’, traditional airs, a Ukrainian Polka and a snatch from ‘The Good Old Days’ TV show. Leonard brought the house down with his hitherto unsuspected humour and finished to thunderous applause.

Also appearing was past president David Miller with a droll recitation of “Holy Willie’s Prayer”€¯, complete with candle and goonie, past president John Caskie put his rich tenor voice to the test with a repertoire of songs, old and new.

Award winning Burns’ reciter Bobby Jess demonstrated his prowess with a performance of the Address to the Deil€¯, the poets’ satirical farewell to Auld Nick€¯.

A comprehensive Vote of Thanks from junior vice president Rab Walker followed by a raucous rendition of Auld Lang Syne brought a particularly enjoyable evening to an end.